Thursday, July 29, 2010

At least the surgeon seemed competent

Adam, Morgan and I were on one side of a thin curtain, the emergency room staff on the other. We could hear them whispering back and forth, seems I was the talk of the ER. Even as an EMT crew rushed someone in on a stretcher, they were stopped by one of the female nurses saying "You've gotta hear what happened to this gal". Though everyone was well aware of what had happened, one by one the entire staff poked their head through the curtain to hear the story for themselves.

"He hit me with a lawn mower."

"No, it wasn't on purpose."

"No, it wasn't running."

"The blade didn't touch me, the front of the mower just bumped into me."

And literally every single person who heard the story responded with some variation of "THAT'S BIZARRE!"

The surgeon arrived, gave me a local anesthetic and began poking around with tweezers. After a quick inspection, he concurred that my achilles tendon was completely severed and had, in fact, retracted back up my leg and was sitting about three inches above my ankle. I needed surgery. Soon.

He began asking questions about my medical history and when I told him I have CF, I was surprised at how knowledgeable he seemed about the subject. He is, after all, a foot surgeon. But, he asked about my PFT's, my current medications and the breathing treatments and exercise that I've been doing to stay healthy. Turns out, he is very close to a family whose two children also have CF. That, coupled with the fact that he never once yawned in my presence or tried to make my incision talk, made me feel a bit more at ease. I was fairly confident that this guy knew what he was doing.

My instructions were these:

Go home.
STAY OFF THAT FOOT!
Don't eat or drink anything after midnight, except in the morning when I would be allowed a couple sips of water to take my antibiotics and pain medication.
Return at 6:00 the next morning for surgery.

The very last thing we discussed before I left the ER was how long recovery from this particular injury usually takes. Dr. Z's estimate: three months on crutches, followed by some pretty intense physical therapy. And it could be up to a year before I make a complete recovery and have full use of that foot again.

I left the hospital thinking well, that's just great. Now answer me this: how am I going to take care of my baby, when can I go back to work, and what in the world am I going to do to keep my lungs clear if I can't exercise AT ALL for three (or likely several more) months?

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Next? The surgery.

2 comments:

  1. OMG.... First of all that sounds very very painful and second of all that sounds very very painful... and further more I feel for you... Moms have a tough tough job when they are at their best, so I cannot imagine being on crutches for more than three months yikes... I will pray for you that is for sure... Wow that is just crazy.... Hugs for Oklahoma.... Marcy

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  2. Ummmm wow! Yeah that Does sound like something that would happen to me. Were you on like cipro or something???
    Sorry to hear you can't exercise, you could do some breathing exercises or something....
    Hope you heal quickly and aren't in too much pain.

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